Each week we will be highlighting the artists for Digital Graffiti 2016. Join us and learn about these incredible artists from all over the world. This week, we’ve got Q&A’s with Emilia Forstreuter from Berlin, Germany, and Tina Willgren from Stockholm, Sweden.

Artist: Emilia Forstreuter
Current Residence: Berlin, Germany
Website: emiliaforstreuter.de
Piece: Yonder

EmiliaForstreuter_DG

How much technology is required to create your work? If you didn’t have it, would you still be able to produce it?
To create a film like Yonder, I use Cinema4D and After Effects. If I don’t have technologies like this to use, I create my work with what is available. Additionally, I also create analog films if it’s suitable.

What do you find most remarkable about projected art?
To be able to create immersive illusions. I’m fascinated by projected art and how artists can break and melt and play with the boundaries between reality and illusion.
What sparked your interest in digital art and how long have you been creating it?

What sparked my interest in digital art was being able to create immersive experiences. I was fascinated by the endless possibilities of digital art. Being able to create anything that comes to your mind. It’s only restricted by your own mind and your level of knowledge of technology. I first started creating digital art during my study in Communication Design and Time Based Art in 2005.

Artist: Tina Willgren
Current Residence: Stockholm, Sweden
Website: tinawillgren.com
Piece: Walk Cycle

Tina Willgren

Have you participated in other projected art exhibitions? Where and how did location play into the work?

I have participated in video festivals and exhibitions, some of which are projection-based. Usually, I make several versions of my videos so they can fit into different contexts. I’m interested in the shifting appearances of digital video, how it can move in between mediums and be viewed on smart phones as well as being installed as massive environments.

How much technology is required to create your work? If you didn’t have it, would you still be able to produce it?

I use computers, cameras, different types of software, screens, and projectors to produce the work. I don’t like to plan too much,  and prefer to have all the necessary technology close to me so I’m able to try things out, experiment, and follow up on chance-like developments. It gives spontaneity to the process. If I would need to hire and book equipment in advance, I suspect I would make much less work, and probably it would also look much different.

Give us examples of where you see projected art headed?

Artists always respond to the technological developments in unexpected ways, so I hope to be surprised! I guess we’ll see more of interactive environments, projected holograms, and maybe smart phones with “snap to object” apps, used as projectors.

What do you find most remarkable about projected art?

How it in an instant can transform environments and create immersive spaces.

What sparked your interest in digital art and how long have you been creating it?

Originally a painter, I experimented with lots of different techniques during my art school years. Dance also had a strong impact on me. I started making videos in 2003 and found it hypnotic. I can explore movement and perception, and the medium itself reflects life in the contemporary world. The ephemeral quality of digital art also suits me well, where the work only exists when being called upon.