Each week, we will highlight the participants in Digital Graffiti 2017. Join us and learn about these incredible artists from all over the world and what informs their artwork. This week, we’ve got Q&As with Gary Justis of Bloomington, IL, and William R. Bullock of Bowral, New South Wales, Australia.

Artist: Gary Justis
Location: Bloomington, IL
Project title: “Drew Dender”
Website: garyjustisphotography.com

How much technology is required to create your work? If you didn’t have it, how would you produce it?
The projected setups are real-time analog projections, digitally captured, then engineered in Photoshop and iMovie.

Without the technology, I would produce the work with traditional film processes. Live performance would also be an option.

What else can you tell us about your work, for example your use of color (or lack of), rhythm or visual texture?
The original projection setups use optical equipment and colored gels and filters. I increase the vibrancy of the image on the computer. I strive to suggest a narrative of sentient form(s) that tell a story through movement and visual transformation.

What do you find most remarkable about projected art?
The aspect of projected art I find most remarkable is the way in which projected images draw and hold the attention of the viewer. We are phototropic because we are drawn to light. Projected light and subsequent motion charges the mind and we are witnesses to a thriving realm outside our familiar order of things.

How do you see expanding your use of projection for your art?
In the area of sculpture, which is the main area of my studio practice, I use light to extend the physical identities of objects. Ambient light can describe visual form, then extending that attribute of light with motion and color the form takes on a hyper-existence. I experiment with kinetics and mechanical movement in general bringing “time” into the work as another material. Light and the motion of projected light adds another layer of material identity in the process; it is subjective and, at the same time, illusive.

 

Artist: William R. Bullock
Location: Bowral, New South Wales, Australia
Project title: “MinoCraftShibuya”
Website: yeeehah.com
 

How much technology is required to create your work? If you didn’t have it, how would you produce it?
My current work is completely digital. From digital still cameras, audio recorders, and computer software, I couldn’t create these works without technology.

 What else can you tell us about your work, for example your use of color (or lack of), rhythm or visual texture?
Layers and textures are important to my work, as representation, especially visual and audio, but also social and environmental. “MinoCraftShibuya” is a social comment on the busiest intersection in the world and the game Minecraft, which is hugely popular with younger computer game players—and plenty of older ones, too. It’s a game where you basically build block worlds and monsters and “mobs” try to kill you. I find it an interesting social phenomena mirroring aspects of the “real” world.

 What do you find most remarkable about projected art?
Of course, the opportunity for many people to share the experience of the art as a group, but also that even if only for a short time, it becomes part of our environment and can leave a lasting impression in our minds about place and time.

 How do you see expanding your use of projection for your art?
I am looking at a couple of collaborations in the near future that will diversify my skillset into more interactive environments. My interest in electronics, 3D, VR/AR, and the potential to create site specific works is where I see the future.