Each week, we will highlight the participants in Digital Graffiti 2017. Join us and learn about these incredible artists from all over the world and what informs their artwork. This week, we’ve got Q&As Jonathan McCabe from Australia’s capital city, Canberra.

Artist: Jonathan McCabe
Location: Canberra A.C.T., Australia
Project title: “Excerpt from 5 Cyclic Hiva Flowpi number 3”
Website: jonathanmccabe.com

How much technology is required to create your work? If you didn’t have it, how would you produce it?
My work is completely dependent on modern computing technology. I couldn’t produce it any other way.

What else can you tell us about your work, for example your use of color (or lack of), rhythm or visual texture?
My work involves writing a computer program, which then produces the art work. I don’t control the color or movement directly, but rather through adjusting the program. I am attracted to rather psychedelic and saturated color combinations, as well as smooth fluid motions without cuts.

What do you find most remarkable about projected art?
I find art projected onto buildings at night wonderful. It gives me a completely different sense of the building, as though it has these other possibilities in it.

How do you see expanding your use of projection for your art?
At the moment, I am concentrating on print series rather than projected art, but I hope to return to projected art soon.

 

Artist: David Bennett
Location: Nashville, TN
Project title: “STRAY VOLTAGE”
Website: redundant.myportfolio.com

How much technology is required to create your work? If you didn’t have it, how would you produce it?
My current work depends on technology to be what it is. For software, I work mainly with After Effects, Studio Artist, Photoshop, Illustrator, Lightroom, Premiere, and Audition. And for hardware, I also use a variety of workstation computers, laptops, iPhones, digital cameras, scanners, photocopiers, printers, projectors, and VHS VCRS.  Without all of that technology it would be less convenient and less efficient to create work in the mode that I do. The technology enables the numerous experiments and alterations during my creative iteration. I am very much drawn to the moving image and can imagine exploring other non-digital means of animation, like zoetropes for example, as a means of continuing to create if it suddenly became necessary to do so without my current technology.

What else can you tell us about your work, for example your use of color (or lack of), rhythm or visual texture?
Generally, my work is process-oriented discovery through repeated experimentation. I begin with smaller motion sketches of exploration around a specific technique or theme, and I’ll generate many iterative renders along these lines. Those small parts then become the building blocks when I move into an editing phase during which I will juxtapose and create relationships for the sake of a longer and more deliberate and cohesive outcome. Music is often an inspiration and guiding force that drives the rhythmic and sequencing decisions in a piece. In my piece featured in this year’s DG, I wanted to include typography as central ingredient. So I sourced and appropriated content from several different generations of advertisements ranging from early 1900s to 1980s. A free-associative narrative emerges from the text when randomly layered together and combined with the accompanying audio track. I enjoy incorporating this degree of chance and accident from procedural automation and randomness. The work explores both figurative/representational imagery and its subsequent deconstruction into abstraction. Ordinary high-saturation colors flashing at varying cyclical frequencies bring a satisfying optical sizzle and intensity that helps to amplify the visual overload alluded to in the title of the piece.

What do you find most remarkable about projected art?
The most remarkable quality of projection art to me is how large-scale public projection can connect and engage the audience in a more profound and immersive manner than when viewing the same work on a personal mobile device. The viewer’s experience and understanding of the art significantly benefits by direct and in-person observation. Projection art is ephemeral and fleeting, and this fragile impermanence gives it a unique vitality and immediacy.

How do you see expanding your use of projection for your art?
Looking ahead to the future, I am interested in pursuing more immersive/interactive experiences with projection art. As well as developing more location-specific projection mapping experiences that explore and challenge perception. I am also interested in incorporating more natural media in the digital space.