Each week we will be highlighting the artists for Digital Graffiti 2016. Join us and learn about these incredible artists from all over the world. This week, we’ve got Q&A’s with Robert Crispe from Sydney, Australia and LIA from Vienna, Austria.

Artist: Robert Crispe
Current Residence: Sydney, Australia
Website: robertcrispe.com
Piece: Die Slow

Robert_Crispe

How much technology is required to create your work? If you didn’t have it, would you still be able to produce it?
For my work, Die Slow, every single frame was created in camera—there was no post production other than a color grade. I used a projector to project the water texture on to the cut out paper models. The software I used was: Dragonframe, Screen Capture Syphon, Madmapper and Photoshop. It was a complicated process, as I used two computers during production. I used one to project the watery imagery and color via Photoshop through Syphon into Madmapper. The other I used Dragonframe to import and follow the resulting animation.

Without this technology I wouldn’t have been able to create the effect I wanted to achieve.

 Give us examples of where you see projected art headed.
Projection art is about the experience of location. It’s a feeling. I can imagine there will be more interactivity, more use of smartphones, and VR headsets, in addition to more use of it in film production.

What do you find most remarkable about projected art?
Two things: The transformation in experience—experiencing a location in a unique way. And, the unique and unplanned interactions between the moving image and architecture. I have no idea where or how my work will work with the architecture in Alys Beach—and that’s the beauty of it—those gems of interaction between the moving image and the architecture.

 Have you or your works received awards or been covered elsewhere by media (newspaper, magazine, broadcast, etc)?
Die Slow has been featured in The Creators Project, Vimeo’s Curated Animation category, and I’ve had some of my work premier in Nylon and Rolling Stone.

 What sparked your interest in digital art and how long have you been creating it?
My interest in this art form has always been around the idea of transformative, as well as technology, and the unknown nuances.

Artist: LIA
Current Residence: Vienna, Austria
Website: liaworks.com
Piece: ALTERATION 109

Lia
Have you participated in other projected art exhibitions?  Where and how did location play into the work?
My works have been shown on the facade of the old Ars Electronica Building (Austria), the BIX facade of the Kunsthaus Graz (Austria), the media facade of the Vattenfall building in Berlin (Germany), and the Todaysart Festival in The Hague (Netherlands). At the moment some of my video works are shown on the facade of the downtown Marriott Hotel in Los Angeles (US).

How much technology is required to create your work? If you didn’t have it, would you still be able to produce it?
I produce my work on my laptop—that’s all the hardware that I use. On the software side, I am currently using Processing and OpenFrameworks.

And of course, if I did not have a computer, I could not produce digital art.

Give us examples of where you see projected art headed.
As there are more and more buildings having fixed outdoor facades, I believe there will be more of a need for this type of content. Not only for advertisement and information, but for the artistic side as well.

What do you find most remarkable about projected art?
I really like the dimension of projected art. It is one thing to see the work on a small computer screen, and it is a totally different experience to see it come to life in the space that is illuminated by it.

What sparked your interest in digital art and how long have you been creating it?
I got my first computer in 1995, and by chance I saw someone programming an interactive CD-Rom. I was absolutely fascinated that one could program to make things on the screen move and change colors and be interactive. That’s why I started to learn how to program by myself. Soon I was quite hooked by the fact that I could create my own images. There was, and still is, always a lot of experimenting with codes, shapes, colors, and movements.