Each week, we will highlight the participants in Digital Graffiti 2017. Join us and learn about these incredible artists from all over the world and what informs their artwork. This week, we’ve got Q&As with Axel Cuevas Santamaria of Columbus, OH, and Luzena Adams of Brooklyn, NY.

Artist: Axel Cuevas Santamaria
Location: Columbus, OH
Project title: “Protoplasmic Routes”
Website: http://axelcuevassantamaria.com

How much technology is required to create your work? If you didn’t have it, how would you produce it?
The set of tools I can get a hold on always shape my work. For “Protoplasmic Routes” I used agar, Automator, After Effects, Photoshop, petri dishes, scanners, text to speech, and oatmeal. Oatmeal is slime mold’s gourmet delicacy.

What else can you tell us about your work, for example your use of color (or lack of), rhythm or visual texture?
The mystery of imaginary worlds I perceive between microscopic and macroscopic scales and the intrinsic relation between technology, nature, and the human spirit are inspirations in my work. Color, rhythm, and textures always come from within.

What do you find most remarkable about projected art?
The immateriality of projections is a pleasure to explore. I find in projected art possibilities for expression yet to be discovered.

How do you see expanding your use of projection for your art?
Projections always tend to expand in my art practice. I am currently playing with fulldome mapping for geodesic domes and planetariums, stereoscopic 360 imagery for VR engagement, and real-time depth maps for interactivity with dancers and performers. I see myself expanding into intermedia collaboration. I love worldwide collaboration with inspiring people that believe in possibilities. I want to take my art practice to Berlin.
Artist: Luzena Adams
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Project title: “Soul Split Particle”
Website: luzenaadams.com

How much technology is required to create your work? If you didn’t have it, how would you produce it?
The digital aspect of my work requires the most technology. Shooting digital footage on and Leica camera was done specifically to get the effect of slow motion. The work is then edited and adjusted in certain computer programs and then handed over the animator who works in After Effects to create the overlaid animation. Although there was quite a lot of technology to create this piece the ultimate goal was to keep it quite organic.

What else can you tell us about your work, for example your use of color (or lack of), rhythm or visual texture?
The color used within the piece where quite monochromatic with hints of blues, greens and yellows. I wanted to colors to be understated so that when they emerged the where popping. The rhythm is essentially quite slow. The figures almost feel like they are in another dimension.

What do you find most remarkable about projected art?
I love the way that projected art can transform an environment, a space or a surface. It can be used in a private space with in conjunction with performance.

How do you see expanding your use of projection for your art?
As an image maker working with projection art is a natural extension for me. I am loving experimenting with this medium both within my shoots and exhibiting my work.