As we gear up for Digital Graffiti 2019, we’ll be highlighting the artists participating in this year’s festival! Follow along each week as we learn about these incredible global talents and their digital works of art. This week, we have Q&As with finalists John McIlduff from Belfast, Ireland, and Eddy Katt from Brooklyn, New York. Artist: John McIlduff Location: Belfast, Ireland Project title: “Drive By Shooting” Website: https://vimeo.com/user18363341 1. How did you find out about Digital Graffiti at Alys Beach? The website 2. Have you participated in other projected art exhibitions? Where and how did location play into your work? We have presented Drive by Shooting at various festivals and exhibitions including the Edinburgh Fringe Festival in Scotland, Dublin Fringe Festival in Ireland, Operadagen in Rotterdam, Holland, and Belfast Culture Night in Northern Ireland, among others. We find that this piece of projected Street Art Opera works in any urban location, the story and mix of comedy and tragedy is universal and can be translated in to any language. 3. How much technology is required to create your work? The technology for this piece is very simple which makes it fantastic for touring internationally. We require a projector of at least 8k along with wireless headphones or a WIFI frequency to transmit the sound. 4. What else can you tell us about your work, for example use of color (or lack of), rhythm or texture? This project wholeheartedly embraces the tropes of stencil-based street art using strong lines and colors, as well as a simple graphic image that gives space to the other elements of the work. 5. What do you find most remarkable about projected art? Public space, public space, public space! Projected work enables you to make small but hopefully healthy contribution to our public space that more and more is polluted by advertising, private corporations, and city planning. 6. How do you see expanding your use of projection for your art? We love this medium. We’ll be making lots more soon – of all kinds – funny, meditative, and most importantly, political. Artist: Eddy Katt Location: Brooklyn, New York Project title: “Suggestive Lillypads” Website: https://vimeo.com/user80806485 1. How did you find out about Digital Graffiti at Alys Beach? I found out about Digital Graffiti through Instagram. 2. Have you participated in other projected art exhibitions? Where and how did location play into your work? My last exhibit was an audio-visual piece for a show at the Palace of Fine Arts. We projected on a large semi-transparent scrim suspended a few feet in front of the wall creating a ghostly double image. 3. How much technology is required to create your work? I primarily use C4D and After Effects to create my pieces. 4. What else can you tell us about your work, for example use of color (or lack of), rhythm or texture? I find myself gravitating towards a certain palate of colors and subjects for a few months. Then one day something new will catch my fancy and it’s on to the next study. 5. What do you find most remarkable about projected art? What I find most remarkable about projected art is how the canvas that is being projected on to drastically changes the final piece. I’ve projected on everything from hillsides to monuments and they all demanded a different approach due to the unique way they handle light. 6. How do you see expanding your use of projection for your art? I’m currently working on some exciting, large scale projection-based projects with Obscura Digital.