Each week, we will be highlighting the participants in Digital Graffiti 2018. Join us and learn about these incredible artists from all over the world and what informs their artwork. This last week of March, we’ve got Q&As with Marpi Marcinowski from San Francisco, CA, and Max Hattler of Hong Kong.

 

Artist: Marpi Marcinowski
Location: San Francisco, CA
Project title: “Mass Migrations”
Website: https://marpi.pl

 

How did you find out about Digital Graffiti at Alys Beach?
Twitter, or possibly some other social media.

 Have you participated in other projected art exhibitions?  Where and how did location play into your work?
Sure, I make a lot of events myself: https://marpi.pl/about/. I usually projection map onto existing architecture to feature and augment it, making my artwork look like it belongs there, such as in my piece “Melting Room.”

 How much technology is required to create your work? 
I use a projector (or multiple projectors) and gaming class computer, and I’ll bring my own Kinect/Vive sensors. It’s a simple setup.

What else can you tell us about your work, for example use of color (or lack of), rhythm or texture?
I work exclusively with interactive art, something people can play with, modify, but also create with. In that way, people are the creators themselves, and I make tools for them. It’s super visual and colorful, but need people’s input to actually become something.

What do you find most remarkable about projected art?
Scale, context, mix with architecture. It’s the closest thing to putting whole groups of people into different worlds.

How do you see expanding your use of projection for your art?
I do a lot of experimental projection mapping, such has HERE, HERE, and HERE. There are so many places to go with it. In general, using real-time generative graphics to let people create something big, it’s like giving them superpowers.

 

Artist: Max Hattler
Location: Hong Kong, China
Project title: “X”
Website: http://www.maxhattler.com

 

How did you find out about Digital Graffiti at Alys Beach?
It was my friend and fellow media artist Robert Seidel who initially made me aware of Digital Graffiti. In 2016, the festival showed my film “A Very Large Increase in the Size, Amount, or Importance of Something Over a Very Short Period of Time.”

Have you participated in other projected art exhibitions?  Where and how did location play into your work?
My film “Sync” was designed to be projected onto a 3-meter-diameter disc elevated slightly from the floor, allowing the audience to congregate around it, like an abstract mandalic camp fire. Later I started to show it in festivals and realized that it also works really well on a cinema screen. Another piece of mine, “Heaven and Hell,” is a video diptych that works best when projected onto two adjacent sides of the corner of a room, immersing the audience in the two opposing variants of Christian eternity. “X” was originally devised for projection onto a water screen emerging from Regent’s Canal in London. This made the presentation quite special, as the piece materializes out of nowhere, and disappears once it is over. It gives the work a holographic quality, and the audience is able to see it from both sides of the canal. But “X” is created in such a way that it can easily adapt to other surfaces. I’m curious to see how it will work at DG2018.

How much technology is required to create your work?
I work with all sorts of techniques from stop-motion to digital 2D and 3D animation. Often, it’s the limitations of simple tools that push you to create interesting work. Too many possibilities can be limiting, strangely.

What else can you tell us about your work, for example use of color (or lack of), rhythm or texture?
I’m interested in using abstraction to create meditative or quasi-psychedelic experience. The removal of everyday signifiers allows for a different audience engagement, in which the work can function as a kind of thinking space. Connected to this is synesthetic experience through the tight interplay of sound and image.

How do you see expanding your use of projection for your art?
I recently started working with stereoscopic projection and 360-degree immersive environments, both of which open up a range of new parameters to work with. It’s still early stages, but quite exciting.