As we gear up for Digital Graffiti 2019, we’ll be highlighting the artists participating in this year’s festival! Follow along each week as we learn about these incredible global talents and their digital works of art. This week, we have Q&As with finalists Hunter Scully, a SCAD student out of Savannah, Georgia, and David Mahler from Melbourne, Australia

Artist: Hunter Scully
Location: Savannah, GA (SCAD)
Project title: “Overhead Color”
Website: https://www.hscully.com

1.How did you find out about Digital Graffiti at Alys Beach?
I found out about Digital Graffiti from SCAD motion media design professor, John Colette.

2. Have you participated in other projected art exhibitions?  Where and how did location play into your work?
I have participated in numerous projection exhibits at Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD), where I map strategically for buildings.

3.How much technology is required to create your work?
Little technology is used to create “Overhead Colors” —the piece’s primary component uses an overhead projector with various liquids that have been stitched together, data-moshed, and glitched.

4.What else can you tell us about your work, for example use of color (or lack of), rhythm or texture?
“Overhead Colors” is an experimental video exploring colors through moving liquids that have been data-moshed to provide an interstellar atmospheric design. The visuals for this piece were created using water, alcohol, oil, food coloring, paint, glass, various soaps, and ice on an overhead projector that was documented by cameras. Eight hours of footage were sorted through to find the best scenes and then data-moshed to create the final piece. All-in-all, the entire project took ten months to compose.

5.What do you find most remarkable about projected art?
My favorite part about this project is the randomness on the overhead projector and how the recreation of the same exact scene is nearly impossible.

6.How do you see expanding your use of projection for your art?
After doing numerous projections, I’ve learned that they can provide a variety of factors, whether they’re more immersive or provide the illusion of self-illumination.

 

Artist: David Mahler
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Project title: “Cosmic Echo”
Website: http://www.davidcmahler.com

 

1. How did you find out about Digital Graffiti at Alys Beach?
I took part in a projection art residency in Melbourne, Australia—the 2017 Signal Screen Commission, run by the City of Melbourne in conjunction with Signal Art Space. The program was coordinated by artist Yandell Walton, a Digital Graffiti alumni. She recommended we all have a go at applying and had nothing but great things to say about the experience.

2. Have you participated in other projected art exhibitions?  Where and how did location play into your work?
The Screen Commission was the most site-specific project I’ve worked on. Myself and the other participants were tasked with designing four-channel projection pieces to be displayed across two long windows along a ninety-degree corner of a building. This encouraged many possible compositions: treating the windows as one long screen, separating into two distinct planes etc. In the end, I created a piece which begins unified, separates into two realms, then coalesces again halfway through to combine into one long image for a split second—relating to the work’s abstract representation of the interconnectedness of the universe—before separating again in two.

3. How much technology is required to create your work?                                                                                           I tend to begin with traditional materials—paint and spray paint in particular. After scanning and photographing, I digitally manipulate elements in Photoshop and then create digital collage animations in the editing programs After Effects add Premiere.

4. What else can you tell us about your work, for example use of color (or lack of), rhythm or texture?
Color and tone are very important to my practice. I utilize vivid bursts of energy erupting from darkness to stimulate the viewer on a sensory level. Sounds fancy, but really most art does this. The idea of employing rhythm and time to entrance a viewer and lure them into a concept is very enticing.

5.What do you find most remarkable about projected art?
Light and movement. The use of light harks back to traditional art forms such as stained-glass windows; when you think about it, stained glass and altar paintings were the only art commonly encountered by people for hundreds of years before serfdom gave way to a middle working class. Imagine once a week entering a somber, quiet space centered around an enormous, sparkling, glittering, cacophony of euphoric color and light, illuminated from behind as if by the touch of God! It’s no wonder the church and in particular transcendent art had such an encompassing grasp. Technology now allows us to reinterpret these ancient means of artistic connection, bringing people together with color and light to experience something deific.

6. How do you see expanding your use of projection for your art?

I’ve dipped my toe into projection mapping, and it’s absolutely something I’d like to explore—engaging architecture or sculpture with projected imagery. Live mixing is another really interesting area. Finally, there are some fantastic artists who use hung layers of sheer material to create a three-dimensional effect to their projections. Next level stuff!