As we gear up for Digital Graffiti 2019, we’ll be highlighting the artists participating in this year’s festival! Follow along each week as we learn about these incredible global talents and their digital works of art. This week, we have Q&As with finalists Jonah Allen, a local from Santa Rosa Beach, Florida, and Kaybid from Istanbul, Turkey.

Artist: Jonah Allen
Location: Santa Rosa Beach, FL
Project title: “Coastal Dune Lake Outfalls”
Website: https://www.jonahallen.com

1. How did you find out about Digital Graffiti at Alys Beach?
I live on 30A, so I discovered the event through being in the area over the years.

2. Have you participated in other projected art exhibitions? Where and how did location play into your work?
Yes, I participated in a group exhibition at the Pensacola Museum of Art called “DocuFlorida II.” It was an exhibition focused on socio-cultural and socio-spatial conditions of natural and built environments of Florida—which is deeply informed by river systems, gulf waters, and their associated industries and economic enterprises. The work was showcased inside a museum, where pieces were projected onto a wall in a small room. Because my photographic work is “of the landscape”, projecting it onto a large wall enhanced the viewing experience. To truly appreciate my work, I believe it must be printed or projected large-scale.

3. How much technology is required to create your work?
To create large format photographic prints and cinemagaphs, a bit of technology is involved. First, I use google maps and other digital satellite maps to research sites of interest. Then, I travel to each location to photograph the landscape and locations. Using a drone, or a handheld camera, I capture photos of a scene which I composite into a single image using a computer (I do not add or subtract anything from the photos, just combine many to make larger prints). Finally, I make a large format photographic print from the digital files which is then framed for display purposes. Or, in this case, I use a combination of apps from the Adobe Suite to turn a photo into a moving picture (a cinemagraph).

4. What else can you tell us about your work, for example use of color (or lack of), rhythm or texture?
My photographic work revolves around interests in the environment, industry, and landscape—all of which include hydrological elements. Ultimately, I aim to contrast the natural beauty of landscapes untouched by mass development, with the landscapes destroyed by human impact, hoping it will inspire respect for the remaining ones. Constantly at play in my photographs is the ephemeral relationship between water and light. My knowledge of the ocean allows me to capture intimate moments with energy in one of its rawest forms.

My most recent work which will be projected at Digital Graffiti, “Outfall,” is an aerial series of watercourses that examines a rare phenomenon called a coastal dune lake outfall. On the surface, this collection is based on the allure of natural fractal phenomena in nature. Within the deeper meaning, the series aims to inspire a deep respect for these rare waterways. In these cinemagraphs, there are natural, vibrant colors of the Gulf water and tannin colored lake water intermixing.

5. What do you find most remarkable about projected art?
Since I am new to art projection, I am excited to explore the strengths of the medium, such as user interaction, movement, and most of all, scale. The scale of large projected art has an impact on the viewer in ways that other mediums cannot compare to—to be engulfed by a large scene is something of high interest to me.

6. How do you see expanding your use of projection for your art?
I see myself exploring the combination of projection mapping with augmented reality in the landscape. The core of what I do is share rare perspectives that people don’t see on a regular basis. What if I could bring people to these perspectives with augmented reality and projection?

Artist: Kaybid
Location: Istanbul, Turkey
Project title: “Kaybid”
Website: https://www.kaybid.live

1. How did you find out about Digital Graffiti at Alys Beach?
I learned about the festival through Instagram.

2. Have you participated in other projected art exhibitions? Where and how did location play into your work?
This is the first time I have applied for an event with this project.

3. How much technology is required to create your work?
I use image editing and video editing software’s, 3d software, and AR technology with smartphones and apps (i.e. PS, PR, AE, Unity, Vuforia etc.).

4. What else can you tell us about your work, for example use of color (or lack of), rhythm or texture?
Kaybid is an urban art “movement” that brings together painting, collage, GIF, animation, video art, and augmented reality. Kaybid consists of small-scale walking animal figures that are spread across the urban landscape.

The singular animals that are installed on the walls are actually each a single moment of a continuous inertia. The passerby on the street does not only see “an animal”, but also gets to witness “a moment.” When asked about life or livelihood, we can’t yet talk about non-carbon-based beings or a habitat other than planet earth—motion is at the very heart of life.

The animals that are wandering the streets silently may remind the viewer that the world does not only belong to humans, and that the urban ecosystem is one that actually is quite alien to the organic realm. The animal images not only bring about an immediate reaction of compassion, but also due their ubiquity and approachability, exist beyond all norms and biases.

I also use time, movement, and light. Every single frame of the animal’s movement is created individually and makes up the cohesive animation when watched back to back, thus bringing motion and life to the image of the animal.

All my collage works are original and unique. None of them are copies, prints or stickers. I made them all with my own hands, using very traditional methods. I don’t use a cutter or any machine. At this point we can describe it as a flirtation with modern technology alongside traditional methods.

5. What do you find most remarkable about projected art?
I evaluate my work from the physical to digital space. I use digital technology in animations and videos while materials and production are completely physical.

In the beginning I produce all the images needed for the video physically, then I prepare the video. The video is first projected back on to the walls as one of the materials to make large-scale reproductions of small-size physical studies on the walls. This way, I can revive my works that will disappear from walls with my projections.

6. How do you see expanding your use of projection for your art?
The diffraction does not use screens other than other image projection tools. Thus, only light uses the light from the surface which it is projected, and it doesn’t produce the light itself—this situation offers us many possibilities such as mapping.