As we gear up for Digital Graffiti 2019, we’ll be highlighting the artists participating in this year’s festival! Follow along each week as we learn about these incredible global talents and their digital works of art. This week, we have Q&As with finalists Rebecca Smith from Nottinghamshire, UK, and Duncan Irving from Moruya, NSW, Australia.

 
Artist: Rebecca Smith
Location: Nottinghamshire, UK
Project title: “Fault Line”
Website: www.urbanprojections.com

 

  1. How did you find out about Digital Graffiti at Alys Beach?
  2. I discovered Digital Graffiti at Alys Beach through social media. I often browse hashtags involving digital graffiti and came across the festival that way.
     

    1. Have you participated in other projected art exhibitions?  Where and how did location play into your work?
    2. I am really lucky that my work has been exhibited throughout Europe and the rest of the world. The work that I produce has been viewed in traditional institutional settings such as The Saatchi Gallery, Tate and The Royal Academy of Arts. However, it is equally shown at home on the streets and in unexpected outdoor locations. With a heavy influence from street art culture, and my love of abandoned sites and objects, I often use forgotten spaces as a canvas for my work. This particular piece, “Fault Line,” premiered in the Egyptian cities of Alexandria & Cairo. It will be fantastic to see the piece in a contrasting location on the opposite side of the globe.
       

      1. How much technology is required to create your work?
      2. Technology influences and drives a great deal of my work. I am constantly seeking to discover new, and original, ways of presenting digital media for audience interaction. It’s important to push the boundaries of creative possibility and find new approaches to mixed media. Whether that involves taking raw data and presenting it in a visual form, or the technical setup of an interactive piece. Regardless of how intricate and complex the concept or technology is though, it’s always important that the audience experience is simple, accessible, and beautiful, that’s what is truly important to me.
         

        1. What else can you tell us about your work, for example use of color (or lack of), rhythm or texture?
        2. This piece was composed with the audio Producer Jimmy Power. It comprises a series of rise and falls, which echo the kind of energy release from plates on the earth’s surface. I am quite a geology geek at heart and wanted to try to visualize these energy peaks and troughs with particles. I often use only white light in my projected content—I think there is something very beautiful and simplistic about a white, projected light, and it can also be incredibly impactful.
           

          1. What do you find most remarkable about projected art?
          2. I love the transformative nature of projection art. It can entirely change the perception, feel, and mood of a space, transporting the viewer somewhere completely different for a short period of time.
             

            1. How do you see expanding your use of projection for your art?
            2. I am continuing to develop new ways of taking projection art to unusual locations, and out on to the streets with mobile projection devices and pop-up performances.  Over the next year I have some fantastic large-scale projects planned, which present really amazing opportunities to use projection in innovative ways. I have also just moved into a new artists studio space at the Harley foundation in the U.K.  This new space means that I have a bespoke space for collaborating and sharing with others. I hope to have a number of open studio events, as well as regular workshops and meet-ups in which I can exchange creative practice in art and technology.
               
               
              Artist: Duncan irving
              Location: Moruya, NSW, Australia
              Project title: “Positive Vibes”
              Website: http://dunk0tron.com
               

              1. How did you find out about Digital Graffiti at Alys Beach?
                I discovered Digital Graffiti while researching for a video projection project online. I thought the festival looked awesome and was inspired to create a piece of work straight away.

               

              1. Have you participated in other projected art exhibitions?  Where and how did location play into your work?
                I have previously animated large format projected work for corporate events, usually super wide panoramic screens at the Sydney Harbour Bridge Pylons NYE and into water screens for Spectra / Marina Bay Sands in Singapore. The location for these events was a huge factor in influencing the type of images and amount of contrast used. Until Digital Graffiti, I have only exhibited personal work on LCD displays.
              1. How much technology is required to create your work?

                The technology to create the work is fairly standard in the motion graphics industry. Pen + ink sketches are scanned then made as vector art in Adobe Illustrator and animated in Adobe After Effects with some third-party software for 3D and particle effects etc. The projection setup for bespoke installations is still something I’m working out.

                 

                1. What else can you tell us about your work, for example use of color (or lack of), rhythm or texture?
                  I’m still processing and working out characters, themes, and concepts. This process has been going at a glacial pace but I feel each year I’m getting closer.

                 For my Digital Graffiti work ‘POSITIVE VIBES’ I used color as the main narrative element. I wanted to create contrast with the rainy night at the beginning, then wash the audience in vibrant palettes and buzzing patterns to convey feelings of anxiety and joy. I also used high detail patterns with basic geometry and reduced character forms to support this. Rhythm was less of a factor in this piece, but I would like to expand this work into a longer duration to tell more of story with audio and more attention to timing.

                 

                1. What do you find most remarkable about projected art?
                  The range of scale and unique site-specific projections that’s possible, along with the immersive magic that the viewer can experience. It allows artists to break out of the 16×9 format and the audience to interact with the work in a way that’s less sedentary than traditional film screenings.
                1. How do you see expanding your use of projection for your art?
                2. I plan to continue a range of animations and installations to extend the universe I am creating while developing my characters and concepts. I would like to focus on creating more looping works, interactive installations, and tell more involved stories.