To get ready for Digital Graffiti 2019 and we’ll be highlighting the artists participating in this year’s festival! Join us, follow along, and learn about these incredible global talents and their artwork. This week, we’ve got Q&As with finalists ruestungsschmie.de from Dresden, Germany and Rebecca Shapass of Staten Island, New York.   Artist: ruestungsschmie.de Location: Dresden, Germany Project title: “CONCEPT³” Website: https://ruestungsschmie.de
  • How did you find out about Digital Graffiti at Alys Beach?
  • We found your festival via social media (Facebook/Instagram).  
    1. Have you participated in other projected art exhibitions?  Where and how did location play into your work?
    2. We have been working in projection based on interactive art since 2010. In 2013, we had our first large-scale projection mapping showcased on architecture. Since we all studied architecture, we always saw the building itself as the main storyteller. A lot of projection mapping projects use the architecture as a simple screen—we never thought that way. We have always been sure of the architecture acting in its own context (large scale as well as the small scale) and its details as capable of giving us everything we needed to produce 10+ minute interior and facade shows. We also discovered that the building itself is an instrument. Not only the architectural elements, such as doors, windows, stairs, lifts, or switches that have their own sound, but also the typical procedures and users of the building create their own soundscapes, and we could record, sample, and use as these a sound portfolio. The soundtracks of our projection mapping are site-specific, individual compositions created by our good friend and sound wizard SOUNDSELEKTOR. Since 2018, we started to use photos and video footage we record during our obligatory site visit before starting the project. We then use this 2D material to manipulate in CAD-Programs and create 3D scenes we can render out in different perspectives, looks, and speeds. This gives us a new site-specific toolbox we can use to create our mappings.  
      1. How much technology is required to create your work?
      2. We use a lot of technology, starting with cameras and microphones. We use 2D and 3D software, pixel and vector based programs, CAD and CGI software, projectors, and a lot of graphic cards.  
        1. What else can you tell us about your work, for example use of color (or lack of), rhythm or texture?
        2. We like black and white, but think color is overrated. We like broken beats, but that pop music can be too much. We love textures, but are biased by our architectural education. < ol start="5">
        3. What do you find most remarkable about projected art?
        4. It offers an overwhelming experience to many people at the same time—when it’s done well. But unfortunately, in a lot of cases it is just the fireworks of a modern era.   
          1. How do you see expanding your use of projection for your art?
          2. We fell in love with interior mapping projects and always want to do more! We have never done a project for a full dome mapping, which would be something new. Working with theaters, stage designers, and dance companies would also be nice.   Artist: Rebecca Shapass Location: Staten Island, New York Project title: “Nervous Butterfly” Website: http://www.rebeccashapass.com  
            1. How did you find out about DigitalGraffiti at Alys Beach?
            2. The Artist Opportunities Facebook Page  
              1. Have you participated in other projected art exhibitions?  Where and how did location play into your work?
              2. I have created projection works, crafting sculptures and environments for light-based artwork, but have never projected directly onto a pre-existing architectural structure as a finite piece of work. Nor have I created projections in response to a specific site.  
                1. How much technology is required to create your work? 
                2. I work with analog video technologies such as tape decks, video mixers, switchers, and synthesizing modules that allow me to mix multiple channels of analog video signals (VHS, MiniDV, Hi8, etc.) in real time. This anachronistic technology is tactile; the creation of the videos I create using it requires a physical engagement with the material that is lost to the digital realm.  
                  1. What else can you tell us about your work, for example use of color (or lack of), rhythm or texture?
                  2. Nervous Butterfly was created in the winter of 2017 while in-residence at Signal Culture (Owego, NY) and completed the following year. The residency home is in a small town in Upstate New York, and during my time there, we had an additional roommate—a large bat. The bat would only come out at night, but it was attracted to the high-pitched hum of the analog machines I was working with. The bat scared me and in response, I created Nervous Butterfly. Using a signal to simulate the flight of a bat – frantic, fleeting, uncontrollable -I built a neon paradise around this otherworldly bat-creature that only existed as a streak of light on the screen. The video has rough, gritty textures laid under bright pinks, purples, and hues of magenta. I often use these colors in my work as a tongue-in-cheek way of symbolizing femininity.  
                    1. What do you find most remarkable about projected art?
                    2. The ephemerality of projected artwork is fascinating to me. I love that the ever-changing context around the piece (in a public projection), continues to shift and change its meaning.  
                      1. How do you see expanding your use of projection for your art?
                      2. I like to think of projection, like all mediums and tools, as an option. Refusing to adopt a singular medium is important in the sense of being contemporary. As a contemporary artist, I like to use different tools for different projects, depending on what best serves my vision, the space (if site-specific), and the needs of the project itself.>