As we gear up for Digital Graffiti 2019, we’ll be highlighting the artists participating in this year’s festival! Follow along each week as we learn about these incredible global talents and their digital works of art. This week, we have Q&As with finalists Ian Gouldstone, from London, UK, and Alexander Dupuis from Providence, Rhode Island.   Artist: Ian Gouldstone Location: London, UK Project title: “Wanton Boys” Website: https://iangouldstone.com  
  1. How did you find out about Digital Graffiti at Alys Beach?
  2. I came across Digital Graffiti through my friend Robert Seidel, who participated in the festival a few years ago. When I saw his beautiful documentation, I was floored by the production quality and ambition of not only his work, but the festival as a whole. It looks incredibly unique and I’m really looking forward to it! 
    1. Have you participated in other projected art exhibitions?  Where and how did location play into your work?
    2. I have made site-specific projections in the past at incredible venues like the Bargehouse Gallery, London, The Old Waterworks, Southend and SLEEPCENTER, NYC. In all of these spaces, I used projected light to highlight and haunt architectural features that you might normally overlook, including rafters, exposed pipework, awkward nooks, among others. Oftentimes, the most interesting places are those dark features that we unwillingly ignore.  I find that when you project onto unconventional objects like these features in buildings or trees or exercise balls, something special happens. Not only does the projected light help us see those objects in a new way—highlighting features and qualities that may not be immediately apparent—but the digital image itself gets interrupted. This forces us to abandon expectations of perfection and control that the digital world promises but can never deliver.  
      1. How much technology is required to create your work?
      2. Currently, I mostly make live computer simulations like Wanton Boys, my piece being shown at Digital Graffiti. These live simulations are different from films or digital videos in that they can run forever without repeating. I make them by writing code that I compile and run on a computer plugged into a display of some sort. I like to work this way because it always produces something lively or surprising, but simultaneously predictable—it’s a bit like staring into a fire where it holds your attention just enough to occupy you, so your mind is free to wander.  
        1. What else can you tell us about your work, for example use of color (or lack of), rhythm or texture?
        2. In my current studio practice, I use repeated processes such as pushing and dropping in my simulations. I find that even these seemingly simple actions, in the right context, can produce poetic rhythms, situations, and variety.  
          1. What do you find most remarkable about projected art?
          2. I am excited by the physicality of projected light; how it becomes an object in its own right.  
            1. How do you see expanding your use of projection for your art?
            2. At some point, I’d like to build my own digital projector. I imagine it will be a one-off project and very limited, but I think it will help me appreciate all of the hard work and imagination that goes into the tools that I use nearly every day. I expect that I’ll run into some interesting surprises along the way too.     Artist: Alexander Dupuis Location: Providence, RI Project title: “G’d(w)^n’s castle” Website: http://alexanderdupuis.com  
              1. How did you find out about Digital Graffiti at Alys Beach? I found out about Digital Graffiti from my friend Jinku Kim who presented at the festival a few years ago.
              2.  
                1. Have you participated in other projected art exhibitions?  Where and how did location play into your work? I haven’t been in any projection-specific exhibitions/festivals, but I’ve had work on LED screens as part of Supernova festival in Denver. This is my first time being in an exhibition dedicated to projection.
                2.  
                  1. How much technology is required to create your work?
                  2. I usually create on computers and code my own graphics. Often one or more projectors are involved to show the animations live.  
                    1. What else can you tell us about your work, for example use of color (or lack of), rhythm or texture? G’d(w)^n’s castle is a digital homage to the psychedelic liquid light shows of the 60’s and 70’s. While those performances used colored oils and paints to animate in time with live music, this system takes advantage of the trippy possibilities that a virtual environment provides—materials can change from liquids to rocks to nebulae, colors can shift, objects appear and dissipate into nothingness.
                    1. What do you find most remarkable about projected art? I’m interested in how projections can be used both to play with and dispel the illusion of on-screen space when projected images interact with physical objects.
                    1. How do you see expanding your use of projection for your art?
                    2. A lot of my work with live projections involves both physical and projected human bodies occupying the same space and seeing what kind of surreal interactions might occur.