As we gear up for Digital Graffiti 2019, we’ll be highlighting the artists participating in this year’s festival! Follow along each week as we learn about these incredible global talents and their digital works of art. This week, we have Q&As with finalists Xinye Lin from New York, NY and Kazuki Ozone from Tokyo, Japan. Artist: Xinye Lin Location: New York, NY Project title: “Zero” Website: https://vimeo.com/user34230560 1. How did you find out about Digital Graffiti at Alys Beach? Through some art open call websites. 2. Have you participated in other projected art exhibitions? Where and how did location play into your work? Yes, at Illuminous held in Boston’s Downtown Crossing. 3. How much technology is required to create your work? 3D software such as rhino, Maya, grasshopper, and v-ray. Video editing programs like premiere and after effect. Then, for coding I use python and c#. 4. What else can you tell us about your work, for example use of color (or lack of), rhythm or texture? My work is trying to use visual language to discuss the philosophical questions that human-beings are always trying to answer, such as “what is space”, “what is the universe”, “what is the parallel universe, “where are we from”, and “where do we go”? It’s inspired by William Blake’s poem “To See a World…”; ‘Zero’ uses topological model klein-bottles as prototypes to explore and illustrate the multi-dimensional space and the parallel universe within the human mind. 5. What do you find most remarkable about projected art? I think the most remarkable part for me is that projected art tends to have a flexible scale and the effect that interacts with both the space and the public. When the art is projecting on an object or in a space, it has the power to redefine that object and space, as well as arouse emotion in the audience. 6. How do you see expanding your use of projection for your art? Through the projection, my works are not limited by actual scale, the object, or specific space. It effectively conveys the unmeasurable mental world to audiences. Artist: Kazuki Ozone Location: Tokyo, Japan Project title: “emoji and pixel” Website: https://vimeo.com/kzkz 1. How did you find out about Digital Graffiti at Alys Beach? I searched “international media art festival” on Google and found DG2019. 2. Have you participated in other projected art exhibitions? Where and how did location play into your work? This is the first time our art is being “projected”! Most of the time they’re in displays, in a museum, or shown in a small theatre. This time I’m really curious about how it goes and incredibly thankful to people who are setting up the site. 3. How much technology is required to create your work? We used python to create images and edit videos. Then we use an Alife algorithm “game life” and an image processing algorithm “superpixel” which played a large role in our production. 4. What else can you tell us about your work, for example use of color (or lack of), rhythm or texture? The main objective of this work is to invoke the existence of pixel with emojis—globally recognizable motifs. Some part of the emojis creates a precise grid, while other parts of it don’t. 5. What do you find most remarkable about projected art? I like that for projected art, the materials of the wall or the lighting of the site truly affect how it’s perceived. I think some extent of this corresponds to the audience having a unique perspective which the creator never even thinks about when creating.